Engineering vs Legionella, Pseudomonas & Retrograde Contamination...

Full House Biofilm Formation Biofilm on copper Electrostatic Forces

(Click on the thumbnails to see full size pictures)

A full house attended our joint SoPHE and IHEEM North West branches CPD seminar upstairs at Manchester's Rain Bar on Wednesday night (20th May) and they were not disappointed by what they heard and saw.  Entitled Engineering vs Legionella, Pseudomonas and Retrograde Contamination of Domestic Water Services by Micro-organisms, the audience were thoroughly engaged for well over an hour and Angus Horne, our Managing Director, was complemented afterwards for his unique and highly unusual presentation style.  With various props and interesting practical demonstrations, Angus gave the Horne philosphy on how engineering can help to mitigate the risk of retrograde contamination of hospital water services.  With the help of beautiful assistant, Sales Engineer Paul Hartley, Angus illustrated how biofilm will attach to almost any suface by electrostatic forces - irrespective of the smoothness of the surface or the substrate material.   He also showed the potential negative impact of using strongly oxidising chemicals to treat pathogens in water systems - where they can irreversibly corrode brass and elastomeric components, resulting in catastrophic failure of system parts.

A further video demonstration showed the critically important function that outlet fittings play in minimising the risk of retrograde contamination of healthcare taps.  The structure of these fittings is designed specifically to stop drain down of the outlet fitting after use.  By not draining down, the tap spout cannot take a 'big gulp' of invariably comtaminated air from the local environment.  By keeping the area of air-water interface to a minimum, the opportunity for pathogens to proliferate (in an otherwise ideal environment: warm and moist) is therefore greatly reduced.

Finally, Angus demonstrated how regular thermal disinfection, paired with elevated velocity flushing, not to be confused with a daily duty flush, can easily be incorporated into a management regime to quickly achieve a considerable improvement to water quality and, by association, control of infection.

This seminar can be made available to Consultant Engineering and Architectural practices, Healthcare Estates and Facilities teams and Water Safety Groups, including IPC practitioners.  Please get in touch via our Contact Form or your local Sales Engineer if you would like to arrange a seminar at your premises.

 

 
 

 

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